How Drinking Water May Help in Losing Weight

 In Health Tips

Many studies show that drinking more water may benefit weight loss

Most of the studies listed below looked at the effect of drinking one, 0.5 liter serving of water.
Drinking water increases the number of calories you burn, which is known as resting energy expenditure.
In adults, resting energy expenditure has been shown to increase by 24–30% within 10 minutes of drinking water. This lasts at least 60 minutes.

Supporting this, one study of overweight and obese children found a 25% increase in resting energy expenditure after drinking cold water.

A study of overweight women examined the effects of increasing water intake to over 1 liter (34 oz) per day. They found that over a 12-month period, this resulted in an extra 2 kg (4.4 lbs) of weight loss.

Since these women didn’t make any lifestyle changes except to drink more water, these results are very impressive.
Additionally, both of these studies indicate that drinking 0.5 liters (17 oz) of water results in an extra 23 calories burned.

On a yearly basis, that sums up to roughly 17,000 calories — or over 2 kg (4.4 lbs) of fat.
Several other studies have monitored overweight people who drank 1-1.5 liters (34–50 oz) of water daily for a few weeks. They found a significant reduction in weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and body fat.

These results may be even more impressive when the water is cold. When you drink cold water, your body uses extra calories to warm the water up to body temperature.

Drinking 0.5 liters (17 oz) of water may increase the number of calories burned for at least an hour. Some studies show that this can lead to modest weight loss.

There actually seems to be some truth behind this, but almost exclusively in middle-aged and older adults.
Studies of older adults have shown that drinking water before each meal may increase weight loss by 2 kg (4.4 lbs) over a 12-week period.

In one study, middle-aged overweight and obese participants who drank water before each meal lost 44% more weight, compared to a group that did not drink more water.
Another study also showed that drinking water before breakfast reduced the number of calories consumed during the meal by 13%.

Although this may be very beneficial for middle-aged and older people, studies of younger individuals have not shown the same impressive reduction in calorie intake.

Drinking water before meals may reduce appetite in middle-aged and older individuals. This decreases calorie intake, leading to weight loss.

Since water is naturally calorie-free, it is generally linked with reduced calorie intake.
This is mainly because you then drink water instead of other beverages, which are often high in calories and sugar.
Observational studies have shown that people who drink mostly water have up to a 9% (or 200 calories) lower calorie intake, on average.

Drinking water may also help prevent long-term weight gain. In general, the average person gains about 1.45 kg (3.2 lbs) every 4 years.

It is especially important to encourage children to drink water, as it can help prevent them from becoming overweight or obese.

A recent, school-based study aimed to reduce obesity rates by encouraging children to drink water.

Drinking more water may lead to decreased calorie intake and reduce the risk of long-term weight gain and obesity, especially in children.

If your target is losing weight please consult me.

Vinita Jaiswal
Weight Loss/Wellness Coach

Recent Posts

Leave a Comment